30 Day Book Challenge – Day 13

Today’s Prompt: Your favorite writer

A very hard question, so let’s bend the rules and make a list!

In no particular order:

Stephen King

It feels like it’s almost a cliche to say that King is my favorite writer. He’s the perennial favorite of a lot of people and for good reason. His books suck me in. Although they include supernatural elements and horrifying scenarios, they are very relate-able. King really knows the human condition. Some of his books are better than others, but I have enjoyed them all.

Tanith Lee

Tanith Lee’s works keep me entertained with their fairy-tale tone and otherworldly scenarios. She writes primarily horror/fantasy novels and is quite prolific. I’d recommend starting with the Tales from the Flat Earth series.

Laurie Halse Anderson

Halse Anderson is a YA author and one of the best writers in that genre. Her debut novel, Speak, won some awards and is known for its controversial depiction of rape. I deeply admire Halse Anderson and hope to someday write with as much clarity and high emotion as she does.

William Shirer

Most well-known for his tome The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich, Shirer is my favorite non-fiction author. (He wrote fiction as well.) His books are written with such detail, the worlds and cultures he describes come immediately to life. Shirer was able to report about the Third Reich directly from Berlin with lucidity – and none of the dryness of other non-fiction writers.

10 thoughts on “30 Day Book Challenge – Day 13

    1. If you decide to give Jane a try, I recommend “Sense and Sensability” or “Pride and Prejudice” about equally.

      And look for hidden nuances in the dialogue (external and internal) . . . that’s her forte. A character “compliments” someone while actually criticizing them. 😉

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    1. I own one of Pynchon’s books, but I have yet to read it.

      I’d be happy too if I got Stephen King, but when I did that test I got Cory Doctorow and I haven’t read anything of his.

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          1. Good choice. Not his best, but probably still the best introduction. If you like it, there are better (and longer) books to look forward to. If you don’t, you haven’t spent the amount of time it would have taken to read Mason & Dixon (probably my favorite, but 600+ pages and written in 17th century English). Or you could read Inherent Vice, which I’m so obsessed with that I have a whole blog devoted to it. But The Crying of Lot 49 is the best place to start.

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