If Nobody Read Your Blog…

…would you still blog anyway?

That’s a question I’ve pondered, and for me, the answer to that question is yes. I would still blog, even if I was the only person who read it. When I started this blog, I never expected for it to get followers and people who regularly comment. I initially started it for myself, but apparently others wanted to read my ramblings about writing and whatever else.

So if everybody stopped reading my blog, I’d still keep writing entries. If my follower count gradually dropped to zero, if comments got fewer and farther between, and if my pageviews dwindled to nothing, I’d still write. The content would change, I think. I’d probably end up writing more rants and raves about my personal life than anything else. Sure, I’d still write about writing, but when given the opportunity, I can be quite self-centered (and that is something I am attempting to rid myself of).

I guess blogging should not simply be a means to an end. As with fiction writing, you should blog because you enjoy it, not because you’re simply trying to gain popularity online or trying to promote your writing or your business. It’s obvious when someone is only blogging as a means to an end — and it just doesn’t seem all that genuine.

“Success in any endeavor depends on the degree to which it is an expression of your true self.” – Ralph Marston

19 thoughts on “If Nobody Read Your Blog…

  1. Good point. I guess it depends on your goal. Like you I started just for fun, without the goal of having a mass following. It was a place to just be myself. There is nothing wrong with the occasional rant and rave =)

    Like

  2. Oh, I agree completely. It’s always sad when a really interesting blog drifts into being just a self-promotion tool (not that I’m against self-promotion, but you know what I mean — the ones which end up being nothing else but). I started my blog (over six years ago) mostly by accident, and for a long time (years) I got no comments and I never looked at my stats. I just wrote about things that interested me.

    (Getting no comments doesn’t mean nobody is reading, by the way. I had a few friends who would read and them email me their thoughts, which still happens today — only bloggers leave comments on blogs.)

    I wrote a post about a related topic a while back, about whether I/you/we would still write if nobody would ever read it. If the answer is yes (and everybody who responded said Yes in one form or another), then that’s a good thing to hold onto.

    Like

  3. Definitely something to think about. I have down days when I want to quit and think it is pointless, but then I can’t imagine not doing it. If it weren’t for blogging I would procrastinate in writing down my stories. Right now it keeps me somewhat focused. I’ve read a lot of blogs about people hooked on stats and have seen others quit for lack of acknowledgment. It does depend on why you do it. Good topic…

    Like

  4. I’ve had this same internal conversation, and the answer is that yes, I would continue. For me my blog is another form of journaling…a release. I’ve become frustrated at times and said “I’ll never write again! What’s the point of it?” And always the point is: because I have to. I have to write to get it out of my system and to gain (hopefully) clarity from all the thoughts and experiences I have each and every blessed day. I write/journal/blog to clear my head. If it helps someone else to do the same, then that’s a bonus.

    Like

  5. Definitely. Nowadays, usually, I get some feedback, somehow, on each of my posts. But say, for example, this time last year, I sometimes got none or sometimes not even any views. But to be honest it didn’t bother me. I knew that this is what I enjoyed so I just continued. And a nice quote.

    Like

  6. Great post Maggie. I have always appreciated your posts. They are full of inspiring and positive insight. I am in my second year of blogging. And I began for the purpose of having an outlet for my visual art and to promote it. But what has occurred is that I have found myself producing more art and on a regular basis. This process of blogging has given me a vehicle for daily creativity and peer response. In its own way it is a much greater vehicle for reaching out than the occasional art exhibit. But it does lack the human contact that an art opening provides. But then who travels from the UK or India to see one of my exhibits ๐Ÿ™‚ Lately I have seeing my stats go up. Putting some pressure on trying to maintain that rise. But I am slowly letting that go. I have other interests … far from the computer. Like biking. So I realize, I can only do so much, and to the rest be content to share what I can. This is a thoughtful post you have given us here Maggie. I hope you do not mind if I re-blog it on my blog for others to ponder as well.

    Like

  7. Reblogged this on n e w d i g i t a l s c a p e s and commented:
    Great post Maggie. I have always appreciated your posts. They are full of inspiring and positive insight. I am in my second year of blogging. And I began for the purpose of having an outlet for my visual art and to promote it. But what has occurred is that I have found myself producing more art and on a regular basis. This process of blogging has given me a vehicle for daily creativity and peer response. In its own way it is a much greater vehicle for reaching out than the occasional art exhibit. But it does lack the human contact that an art opening provides. But then who travels from the UK or India to see one of my exhibits ๐Ÿ™‚ Lately I have seeing my stats go up. Putting some pressure on trying to maintain that rise. But I am slowly letting that go. I have other interests โ€ฆ far from the computer. Like biking. So I realize, I can only do so much, and to the rest be content to share what I can. This is a thoughtful post you have given us here Maggie. I hope you do not mind if I re-blog it on my blog for others to ponder as well.

    Like

  8. Not me! I accidentally fell into blogging while trying to “build a platform” for my fiction. If nobody read my blog, I’d drop it and turn it into a website with some static pages about my writing projects, and a little “about me” thing. Eventually it might get more exciting if I ever published a book and had some interesting things to say…and found an audience again.

    If there’s no audience, it changes my writing quite a bit (more self-centered rants, as you pointed out), and I’d rather keep those private. I love my paper diary so much more, anyway – it keeps me away from the screen and I don’t have to edit, and I can draw and sketch and tape things in.

    Like

    1. If I had to choose between my paper diary and my blog (even though they’re two totally different things), I’d choose my paper diary. So much more can be said within it.

      Like

  9. I like to think that a blog post gets the creative juices flowing at the start of the day. Once they are coursing thorugh the writerly viens, then knocking out a 80,000 work epic is easy and can be finished by lunchtime ๐Ÿ™‚

    Like

  10. Nice post, and nice thoughts! I was adverse to blogging for a while. I felt my pearls of wisdom were costume jewelry at best and I was like a little kid playing dress-up. I write FICTION, not State of the Union! But it’s been fun, and sometimes a good ramble helps me ready myself to write. This A to Z challenge has been a good test.

    Like

Comments are closed.