Closet Blogging

Do you tell people you know in real life about your blog? I don’t. If they happen to find it online somehow, then that’s just fine, but chances are, people are not as interested in you than you may think they are. They tend to be more interested in themselves; therefore, if you really want the people you know in real life to know about your blog, you should tell them and not solely advertise online. If someone I know in real life asks me if I blog or if I have a blog, I tell them I do, but I don’t go further than that unless they continue to ask.

I don’t openly advertise my blog online, either. I have my blog linked to Twitter, and I have the link to my blog on some other websites. That’s the extent of it. People find my blog through search engines, the tags/categories on WordPress, and through the awesome people who have my blog on their blogrolls. I don’t go around saying, “Hey, check out my blog!” because to me, it seems like bragging. I’ll put the link to it up online, don’t say anything about it, and if they’re curious, they’ll click. If they don’t care, then no amount of shameless self-promotion is going to make them click, and as a matter of fact, it may even end up annoying your potential visitors.

I’m kind of an in-the-closet blogger. If an interesting topic comes up in a real life conversation, I won’t say, “Ooh, I might write about that on my blog!” or “I blogged about that the other day!” Instead, I’ll quietly nod to myself and make a mental note. It’s like a secret that isn’t really a secret. Almost like how you think the posts you make on Facebook are 100% secure. They’re not. Someone could listen in.

21 thoughts on “Closet Blogging

  1. No, I openly blog. I have links on the koi websites that I use and on my twitter page, the only think not linked for others is my facebook. I might decide to use that later on, not so sure.

    I am open, honest and blunt in how life is. People like it or don’t. It helps them or it doesn’t. I’ve had more ‘nice messages’ though, in fact never had anything negative. πŸ™‚ always a good thing.

    D

    Like

  2. I’m the same way myself. I don’t promote my blog, I just use it as a place to speak my thoughts and have a conversation with those who providentially happen upon it from my twitter or facebook feeds or (more commonly) through google searches about obscure topics like Heman the Ezrahite or the views of the military in Jane Austen novels or something like that. And it can be a bit disconcerting to meet people for the first time and to find that they have views of you (and sometimes fierce ones) because of the blog entries they have read. So, you’re not alone there.

    Like

      1. There is really not much of a gap between my online self with my real self, but my online self (being merely textual) lacks context, and without the context a lot of people tend to like to assume what I say in unfriendly and unintended ways.

        Like

        1. The main “gap” between my real life self and my online self is that my real life self hardly ever talks. I say maybe two words all day, so because I don’t talk in real life, people seem to assume I don’t think either. It’s odd.

          Like

          1. There is another blog I comment often from an acquaintance of mine who has the same issue–she is a very thoughtful person and yet is so introverted by nature that people are often shocked to hear her online persona in the absence of having heard her speak as she thinks.

            Like

  3. I avoid having people I know in real life reading my blog by hiding my real name when I’m online. I even use alternative screen names, so my other online activities do not intersect with my blog. I’m weird that way. And the closer to personal details I get in my writing, the more likely I’ll label it as fiction, just to protect myself. I clearly am not cut out to become a famous writer.

    Like

    1. Same here; I don’t think I’m cut out to be a famous writer either. Or if by some chance I did become famous, I’d be extremely reclusive.

      Like

      1. You could be the next Thomas Pynchon. πŸ™‚ (Though, with everything I read about the amount of promotion writers are expected to do these days, I wonder if there could even be a next Thomas Pynchon.)

        As for my blog, I handle it the same way you do. I promote it (when appropriate) on other blogs, but I don’t make a big deal of it IRL, except with people who I think might actually be interested in what I write about.

        Like

  4. This post just says everything perfectly. I’m the same as you in terms of my thoughts – I make a ‘mental note’ of things when they’re good things to write about. I also don’t connect to Twitter or Facebook (or anything else). I don’t really like the whole process of publicising my blog to people I know because I know they will judge me – regardless of whether that’s in a good or bad way.

    Like

  5. My blog address is printed on my business cards . . . but I don’t hand them out very often.

    I might mention my blog, in passing. If the person asks for details, I share. If they don’t, the conversation moves to another topic. It’s all good.

    Like

  6. I post links to Facebook sometimes. But I recently remade my blog under a pen name. I am going to graduate school in counseling psychology and I felt the need to separate my professional life and my writing life. I wouldn’t want clients to search the web and find a blog showcasing some of my more personal thoughts.

    Like

    1. I totally understand that one. I personally wouldn’t mind if people I worked with or my boss found my blog, but that all depends on what you choose to write about.

      Like

  7. I agree and disagree with you. I have two blogs; one I keep private so I can vent about my life. My name is mentioned no where on it, and I don’t tell anyone about it. I don’t add names of who I write about, but it’s my way of being brutally honest without having to change my words to spare feelings. My other blog, I actually do post the links on Facebook. I use it for short stories, as well as keeping people updated with the progress of my life. I feel like sharing it helps avoid answering questions. I also think sharing it helps me get my short stories out there. I’m not a very confident writer, so having people I know read it gives me a little confidence boost. Granted like most 20 something girls, it’s my family that tends to read it most.

    Like

    1. Sometimes sharing things online does boost confidence. It’s good to have a more personal blog to vent feelings. I had one like that for a long time, then finally took it down. I preferred physically writing things like that on paper.

      Like

Comments are closed.