Facebook Fatigue

I haven’t been on Facebook in almost three years, so I don’t have Facebook fatigue. However, according to this article, other people are getting tired of it. People are taking long breaks from Facebook, which says they are no longer as interested in the social network as they used to be. To me, that’s a good thing.

Social networks have their good points and their bad points, but for the most part, I see them as more of a time-waster than anything else. I can understand if you’re using Facebook for marketing or for your job or for connecting with relatives you hardly ever see, but most of the time, nobody pays as much attention to your posts as you think they do. It’s like yelling in a cave and hearing your own voice echo back. Social networks give people the guts to say things that they would never say to others’ faces. Social networks can help the spread of rumors and pointless drama.

The key to being on social networks is the key to a lot of other things in life: self-control. Everything in moderation. If you think you’re spending too much time on Facebook, then take a break. A good percentage of people are doing this, and that’s good. There are many people who don’t believe in moderation. I personally think I’m spending way too much time on Twitter and Tumblr, so I should probably take a break. It’ll be a good thing to give up for Lent.

Are you suffering from Facebook (or social network) fatigue?

13 thoughts on “Facebook Fatigue

  1. I’m still enjoying Twitter and getting the hang of making LinkedIn useful or at least entertaining. It wouldn’t bother me a bit if Facebook and Google+ went the way of MySpace. I burned out on all that crap a long time ago.

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    1. Yeah, I think I’d jump for joy if Facebook went under. I wouldn’t care one way or the other if Google+ failed. And to me, LinkedIn is more useful than bothersome.

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  2. Started the whole Facebook thing to keep in touch with family. It’s touted as an essential part of the self-published writer’s platform, but I’m not convinced of that. I guess that as long as my family uses it for communication I’ll stick with it.

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  3. Self control and moderation are two powerful words. Mastering them in practice can enable anybody get to any height without distraction.
    I really don’t think that facebook distracts me.
    Breaks are also good, from time to time. The lent can be a good time to permanently get rid of any bad habits.
    Good reminder! 🙂

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  4. Your point about “yelling in a cave and hearing your own voice echo back” is really true. Last fall I got off FB for a few months and only one person even noticed. 🙂

    Now I pop on occasionally, but mostly to communicate with that one person.

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    1. I think there’s some statistic that says “you really communicate with only 5% of your Facebook friends.” That was true for me when I was on FB.

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  5. Maggie,
    A timely post. I have found myself barely going on once a week now. There is just too much “junk”. I enjoy personal photos or updates and I find that whenever I go on all I see is advertising stuff or people posting the same jokes, etc. BORING and a waste of time as you said…

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  6. I spend too much time on Tumblr too. But I have been one that has taken a break from Facebook. I purely use it for communicating via messages with people for things that are actually important.

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